Things to Check Out: Explore Downtown Los Angeles

Things to Check Out: Explore Downtown Los Angeles

A friend asked about recommendations on places to check out around Los Angeles. Considering it’s such a large city, I had to break this request into several parts.

So here it goes. One of the hippest places for the 21+ crowd is Downtown LA, also known colloquially as DtLA. Here are some cool things to do in the area.

Walk through the Arts District.

Look around, there’s just so much street art to see! If you’re a museum-junkie like I am, you’re sure to enjoy this neighborhood since admission to Hauser Wirth & Schimmel is free.

Looking for the perfect gift for your hipster friends? Poketo surely has something to fit their aesthetics.

In the Arts District, there’s also a farmer’s market during the day. At night, should you choose to stay past sunset, Angel City Brewery is laidback with lots of room, food trucks, and tabletop games!

Brunch at Egg Slut at Grand Central Market.

The Market is also home to gluten-free ramen there as well as famous ice-cream. As you exit, you’re across from Angels Flight Railway, close to where “500 Days of Summer” was filmed.

Don’t mind spending more time Downtown?

Get tickets to MOCA, which can also get you admission to its sister branches in West Hollywood and Little Tokyo. Then check out the classic Pacific Electric Building. If you’re looking for live music, some people like the view from Perch.

Support the artists on the upper floors of The Last Bookstore, or at least get cheap books and new profile photos upstairs. Afterwards, you can share some world famous macaroons in Botega Louie or splurge for dinner there.

Noteworthy mentions include the Central Library, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Staples Center, City Hall and Grand Park.

Notice something missing? While Little Tokyo technically is part of DtLA, I have to devote a different section for this neighborhood. There’s just too much to say! It’s the perfect place for foodies, arts patrons, museum goers and those interested in Japanese American history.

Afterwards, let’s talk about Chinatown/Olvera Street.

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